Campus News News

Springfield College Remembers 9/11

Andrew Gutman
Features Editor

September 11 is still a somber day across the United States. On the campus of Springfield College, the AmeriCorps group handed out good deed cards in the Union to reinforce kindness and caring for each other on such a difficult day for many students, staff and faculty alike. (Photo courtesy Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/MCT)
September 11 is still a somber day across the United States. On the campus of Springfield College, the AmeriCorps group handed out good deed cards in the Union to reinforce kindness and caring for each other on such a difficult day for many students, staff and faculty alike. (Photo courtesy Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/MCT)

Yesterday marked the 12-year anniversary since the horrific terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. Many lost their lives years ago on this day and many were heroes in a desperate time of need.

As homage to those who lost their lives,  the AmeriCorps here at Springfield College partook in the National Day of Service and Remembrance.

During lunch in the Richard B. Flynn Campus Union, members of AmeriCorps handed out good deed cards to try and reinforce the kindness that should be spread on such a difficult day. Certain cards read “put money in a donation box for charity” as well as “write a letter to a good friend or family member to let them know how much you value them.”

One of those members was Peter Chirichiello, a second year graduate student who does field work through the AmeriCorps office. Chirichiello feels that those good deeds are essential on such a difficult day for many.

“I think we all remember after 9/11 everyone was very supportive and doing nice things for people, and we want to keep that going in hopes that they do the same,” said Chirichiello. “Hopefully they realize that they like doing good deeds…and that they follow through with it again and again and again.”

Twelve years is a long time, and although the credence “Never Forget” is something that all of us  Americans understand deeply, it is important to remember not only what happened on that day, but also to reflect on it.

“I really want people to be able to reflect in the middle of their day on the losses we had, but also have that reflection  spur them into thinking, ‘How can I make a difference?’” said David McMahon, director of Spiritual Life at SC.

“They may not be a first responder or confronted with a large tragedy (like 9/11), but there are little tragedies that go on throughout our community…so maybe taking moments today to ask how can I make a difference, is our true legacy,” added McMahon.

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