Op-Eds Opinion

Breaking Bad: The Final Season

Walter White frantically packs his suitcase in attempt to flee during last week’s episode of Breaking Bad. This season marks the final season of AMC’s hit show, which has enthralled a multitude of fans with its intense characterization and thrilling plot. There are only a few episodes left in the final season. (Photo courtesy Breaking Bad Facebook Page)
Walter White frantically packs his suitcase in attempt to flee during last week’s episode of Breaking Bad. This season marks the final season of AMC’s hit show, which has enthralled a multitude of fans with its intense characterization and thrilling plot. There are only a few episodes left in the final season. (Photo courtesy Breaking Bad Facebook Page)

Connor Getz
Staff Writer

***SPOILER ALERT***

First and foremost, anyone who is not caught up to live airings of the second half of season five should refrain from reading any further, as an immense amount of the show will be discussed in depth.

Every diehard fan of AMC’s hit show Breaking Bad knows, as of this past Sunday’s third-to-last episode in the final season, Walter White is “in full Heisenburg mode” (according to a friend of mine). We’ve recently witnessed him get pushed to and past his point of no return, primarily due to the murder of Hank and the effects it had on his family. With just two episodes remaining in one of the most gripping and thought-provoking TV shows ever, here is a bold prediction and an Easter egg (hidden message or theme) to take into account before we finally discover the fate of one of pop culture’s greatest and most complex characters.

Walter kills Jesse and Skylar:

One of the most noticeable themes in the show that may not even be entirely noticeable until you go back and see for yourself are the habits that Walter adopts from those he murders and in some cases, subtle foreshadowing. The first and most simple example goes back to season one and Krazy 8. Before Walt claims his first victim, it is learned that the gangster chained up in the basement prefers his sandwiches with the crust cut off. Fast forward to season three and you’ll see Walt cutting the crust off his own, and that’s just scratching the surface.

Back before Gus got a special delivery from Hector Salamanca he drove a blue Volvo, never strayed from the “cheerful business owner” character, and laid a towel on the floor to rest his knees on before throwing up in the toilet (shown during the episode when Don Eladio and the cartel are poisoned). Now, with Gus six feet under, look ahead to season five and Walt has now sold the Pontiac Aztek for a white Volvo he briefly uses, adopted the same “blameless business owner” persona which he puts on display when characters like Lydia and Saul visit the car wash, and despite him never seeing Gus lay the towel down while preparing to puke, does the same for the first time when he kisses the porcelain in the first episode of the second half of the season. Hold on, one more key character.

Mike’s death may have been one of the most disappointing of the series, even more so than Hank’s, and his traits may be the least obvious or important, but they’re there. When he and Walt meet at the bar at the beginning of season four they both order a drink, Walt without ice and Mike on the rocks. Like always, their conversation gets mildly heated and at one point Mike says to him, “learn to take yes for an answer.” Hop into the last episode in the first half of season five and Walter is all of a sudden having his drinks on the rocks when he’s at Hank’s and telling Lydia when they meet at the café to talk business that she should, “learn to take yes for an answer.”

So, how is this evidence that Jesse and Skylar are next? We’ll start with Skylar because there’s a little more evidence that all comes in the first episode of season five when Walt is in the diner celebrating his 52nd birthday alone. One of the traditions that Skylar practiced in the White household was breaking up bacon and organizing it on the plate in the shape of the age of the person whose birthday it was. Before indulging in his gourmet meal at Denny’s, Walt organizes his bacon into the shape of a 52. Not proof enough? When the waitress asks for his ID to prove that it’s his birthday so he can have his meal for free, we find out it’s a fake with the last name Lambert, which just so happens to be Skylar’s maiden name.

There is only one small piece of evidence supporting my claim for Walt murdering Jesse and that is the green army jacket he always wears when the two are cooking for Gus. Well, in the flash forwards when Walt returns to his rundown home and also when he’s in the diner you should recognize that same jacket, just that it clearly no longer belongs to Pinkman.

Doors are extremely significant:

On three consecutive birthdays (50th-52nd) Walt enters his home under different circumstances with different facial expressions. Yes, this sounds insignificant and is hard to picture without pictures, but it all goes back to a conversation Jesse and Jane had about a piece of art involving a door.

Jesse: You know, I don’t get it. Why would anyone paint a picture of a door, over and over again, like, dozens of times?
Jane: But it wasn’t the same.
Jesse: Yeah…it was.
Jane: It was the same subject, but it was different every time. The light was different, her mood was different. She saw something new every time she painted it.

If you think about Walt and how he has changed so greatly over the last three years of his life, this will click. Remember, Breaking Bad is on AMC at 9 p.m. on Sunday nights and there are just two episodes left.

Leave a Reply