Op-Eds Opinion

Get Ready for the Stanley Cup Playoffs with Goon

The Stanley Cup Playoffs started last night with three great games. To get me in the mood for the two-month epic saga that is the NHL’s playoff tournament, I watched a relatively unknown cult sports-comedy movie, Goon.

Nick Lovett
Online Editor

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy: Goon Facebook Page
Photo Courtesy: Goon Facebook Page

The Stanley Cup Playoffs started last night with three great games. To get me in the mood for the two-month epic saga that is the NHL’s playoff tournament, I watched a relatively unknown cult sports-comedy movie, Goon.

Goon is a movie about a bouncer turned semi-pro hockey god because he was able to fight. A goon, for those non-hockey fans out there, is a player who is not necessarily skilled, but they can fight and they act like an enforcer on the team. This player is on the team to protect the team’s star players as well as instill fear in their opponents.

This move stars Seann William Scott (American Pie, Role Models) as Doug Glatt, the lovable bully, Jay Baruchel (This is the End, Knocked Up) as his best frined, Pat, hockey TV personality, Alison Pill (The Newsroom) as Eva, Doug’s love interest who is dealing with personal battles, and Liev Schreiber (X-Men, Ray Donovan) as Glatt’s hero turned rival Ross Rhea, who was the league’s premier enforcer before Glatt came into the picture.

This movie is in no means supposed to be taken seriously, as there are sex jokes and other forms of dirty jokes throughout. As expected with hockey, there is some heavy language in this movie and the movie definitely earns its “R” rating.

The movie itself starts with Glatt as a bouncer, as he and Pat go to a hockey game to blow off some steam. After a brawl on the ice, Pat starts heckling a player and that player jumps over the boards to attack Pat and Doug. Doug moves in to defend Pat and ends up knocking out the hockey player. The coach of the team calls Doug and offers him a contract.

Doug does not stay long with the minor league team because another team, a high-level semi-pro team, wants Doug’s services because one of the star players is in a funk. The star player, Xavier Laflamme, played by Marc-Andre Grondin (mostly French things), has been in a drought since he was laid out on an illegal hit from Rhea. One of Clatt’s jobs on the team is to get Laflamme’s confidence back up so he can start scoring goals at the clip he is used to. While there, he teaches all the washed-up players the true meaning of being a teammate and what being a part of the brotherhood that is hockey is all about.

Glatt serves as a hybrid of Shawn Thornton and John Scott. He does have some flashes of brilliance, mostly by mistake, where he gets a goal and a couple of assists, and he also blocks a couple of shots as well. His John Scott side comes out because he has no idea how to skate and he has terrible fundamentals. The only difference between Scott and Glatt is that Glatt doesn’t take cheap shots.

Some NHL players make cameos in this movie like Georges Laraque, which makes this movie awesome. Laraque was an enforcer in the NHL during his career, so it was cool to see him doing what he does best on the silver screen.

Overall, this movie is not one to watch if you’re in the mood to watch award-winning quality and excellent acting. Though the acting in this movie is good, the movie is B-quality, but has laughs throughout and has a great message about the brotherhood of hockey. If you want to watch a movie to pump you up about the Stanley Cup Playoffs that’s not Miracle or Slap Shot, this is definitely worth your time.

I’m not going to rate this like a normal movie because I didn’t come in expecting anything amazing, but it is amazing in it’s own right.

 

Final Score (Weighted) –

8/10

Leave a Reply